Participation Is Not Enough - Bark Communications

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  • Apr25Thu

    Participation Is Not Enough

    April 25, 2013

    Posted by Brian Klassen

    Names In A Hat
    I read a great article called "How Adults are Stealing Ambition from Kids" by Tim Elmore. This article not only resonated with me from a family perspective, but from a brand/organization one as well.

    It seems to me that we are in a day and age where participation is enough – right?

    Wrong.

    The attitude of "I participated and did my best (which often means I did my best without straining myself), therefore the world/marketplace owes me, is all to familiar. Or maybe you don't think it owes you but you do think it will magically happen just because you participated.

    This simply is not the reality – and never was. A strong, successful brand/organization takes massive amounts of energy and resources. Putting a junior out of college in charge of your brand development because it's "affordable" is not enough (nor is it fair to the person). Allocating .5% of your budget to brand communications is not enough. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., is not enough. A five-day response time is not enough. A Facebook page is not enough. Writing a blog once a quarter is not enough. Having competitive pricing is not enough.

    Participation does not equal success. It's not enough when you are 16 trying to impress your summer job employer and it certainly isn't enough when you are trying to grab the attention and imagination of a massive, over-stimulated marketplace.

    Intelligent, creative, hard work results in success. Success inspires discovery of better ways, more creativity and an excitement that inspires everyone to work harder – which creates more success – which creates … you get the picture.

    The effort we put into our brands (the organizations personality/how the market views us) will be directly proportionate to the success we experience.